Brief note about COMMUNITY MANAGED SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

 

SERP initiated Community Managed Sustainable Agriculture (CMSA) in 2004 as part of its mandate to eradicate poverty and to improve livelihoods of the rural poor. CMSA was meant to support the poor farmers to adopt sustainable agriculture practices, to reduce the costs of cultivation and increase net incomes. This initiative aims to address the major causes of agriculture distress - extensive use of chemical inputs, high costs of agriculture, displacement of local knowledge, unsustainable agricultural practices like monocropping, imperfect markets etc

CMSA is a paradigm shift in moving from input centric model to knowledge and skill based model. It involves making best use of locally available natural resources and takes best advantage of the natural processes. The main objective of CMSA is to bring sustainability to agricultural based livelihoods, with special focus on small and marginal farmers, tenants, agriculture labour and women. Its major objective is to making small farming viable.

The core investment is on supporting community managed extension system than on material inputs. CMSA is essentially a farmer centered movement. Transfer of technology is through community based local best practicing farmers. Farmers field school (FFS) is the key activity for transfer of technology. Farmers upgrade knowledge by sharing, observations and experiments. 20-25 farm families formed into a group known as “Sasyamithra Sanghas” and these sanghas are assisted by a paid village activist (a practicing farmer) and paid cluster activist (for a group of five villages, he is also a practicing farmer).

CMSA is focusing on building community best practitioners in technology transfer. They are known as “Community Resource Persons (CRPs)”. These community leaders are role models, who have adopted CMSA practices successfully in their fields and improved their net incomes.

Capacity building is the key component in CMSA. Financial support is only in the form of capacity building and transfer of technology. Components of capacity building includes, life cycles of pests and on enabling climatic condition for disease prevalence and spreading, farming systems, sustainable use of resources, maximizing output from a unit land area, effective utilization of inputs like Seed, organic fertilizers, sun light, water, land etc. Conservation of Renewable Natural Resources and Genetic bio diversity both flora and fauna, and SRI in Paddy received special attention. Massive capacity building programs were organized to build the capacities of various stake holders.

Program management is done by the SHG women. Separate sub committees with practicing SHG women, NPM farmers, at village, Mandal (Sub district) and district level are formed to monitor day to day activities. All these sub committees are meeting once in a month to review the program Budget is provided for subcommittee’s field visits and review meetings. Sub committees will review the performance of Village activist, cluster activist and DPM on monthly basis. Samakhyas attend FFS meetings, make field inspections, pay salaries of VA/CA. Communities are involved in decision making process. The final word in programme management lies with the VOs and MSs.

Methods promoted under CMSA are blend of scientifically proven technology, local wisdom, and, farmers’ innovations. Over a period of time these methods are building good ecology where there is a balance between friendly insects and crop pests, and this is leading to reducing the costs on pest management to ‘zero’. Further, the focus is on building life into the soil by adopting various recommended practices, such as monocot - dicot crop combinations, multilayered poly crop system to harvest maximum sun light, mulching, creating enabling environment for local deep borrowing earth worms, efficient composting techniques and by using dung based inoculants paving way to reduce and eventually eliminate chemical fertilizers. Extensive use of Azolla in Paddy fields has reduced Urea usage drastically.

Interventions

Methods promoted under Community Managed Sustainable Agriculture (CMSA) are blend of scientifically proven technology, local wisdom, and, farmers’ innovations. Over a period of time these methods are building good ecology where there is a balance between friendly insects and crop pests, and this is leading to reducing the costs on pest management to ‘zero’. Following are the major intervention promoted under CMSA:

A.Non Pesticide Management (NPM) along with comprehensive soil fertility management: The main principle underlying NPM is that pests can be managed by understanding their behavior and lifecycle. The emphasis is on prevention rather than control. A comprehensive strategy is evolved for pest management. These include: deep summer ploughing, community bonfires, seed treatment, bird perches, border crops, trap crops, yellow and white plates, intercrops, light traps, pheromone traps, delta traps in Ground nut, Alleys in Paddy, Cutting of the tips in Paddy at the time of transplantation. The above practices are called as ‘non-negotiables’ and are mandatory for all NPM farmers. The application of botanical extracts is only as a last resort.
Another key part is the Comprehensive soil fertility Management. As part of this the Focus is on building soil microbial activity. Every crop removes substantial amount of nutrients. However the share of grains would be in the range of 15%. The core principle of natural soil fertility enhancement is to return the crop residues to the soil, either directly or through animal route during the crop period. To sustain the productivity level, the nutrients removed by the crop have to be replenished. Mulching, incorporation of straw and other crop residues into soil will replenish the soil. Role of earthworms is critical in soil fertility management. CMSA adopted three pronged strategy to enhance earth worm activity in soil: elimination of chemical fertilizers, adopting mulching and application dung based inoculants.

B. Marketing Premiums for Pesticide free and organic products: In addition to reducing the cost of production, crops raised without the use of pesticides and fertilizers are commanding higher prices in the market. Although CMSA produce is not certified as ‘organic’, there is a growing recognition of the benefits of pesticide and fertilizer-free vegetables, lentils and cereals, especially in the urban retail market. The increase in prices is currently in the range of 14 -33 percent for vegetables, red gram (lentils),chilli peppers, cotton and rice. And this price realization comes to the producer without the hassle of middlemen, as marketing operations are handled by the District and Sub-district Federations.

C.Rain fed sustainable Agriculture (RFSA): Radical soil and moisture conservation works which includes Conservation furrows for every 4mts, trench around farm, farm pond and compost pit. Main objective of this intervention is to harvest rainwater and to increase cropping intensity.

D.Household nutritional security models (36X36 models): 36*36 models have been promoted by CMSA as a tool to achieve nutritional security at the household’s level. As the crops diversity ranges from tuber crops to fruit crops, from vegetables to pulses, all the nutritional requirements for a family are met. This model is unique as it promotes nutritional security and round the year income to the family, in the smallest land extent possible.

E.Poorest of the Poor (POP) strategy: PoP Strategy in CMSA is to facilitate the land lease to the landless laborers and promote CMSA in these lands lands.  0.5 acre land will be leased in to these PoP, and they shall do SRI Paddy cultivation in 0.25 acre and 36*36 model or poly crops in the remaining 0.25 acres.  It was thus designed to achieve two objectives. One is that the PoP family should earn a net income of Rs.50, 000 in a year and second one is by growing all crops, i.e.  Paddy, vegetables and pulses, the PoP family shall have food security. Apart from selling the produce, they can save something for their own consumption.

F.System of Rice Intensification (SRI): System of Rice Intensification (SRI) is a cost effective and resource efficient method of cultivation of Paddy.  SRI is promoted to reduce ground water exploitation and to increase yields.

Table 1: Scale of Interventions:
Following table shows intervention wise no of farmers benefited and the incomes realized by them over a period of time. Total population refers to the population in CMSA villages.

S.No

Intervention

No of districts

No of Mandals

Covered Population

1

Non pesticide Management and  Comprehensive soil fertility management  ( NPM)

22

653

15,61,342

2

Rain fed sustainable Agriculture ( RFSA)  in convergence with MGNREGA 

21

321

25,000

3

System of Rice Intensification ( SRI)

22

100

28,813

4

House hold level nutritional security model (36X36 models)

22

653

1,06,489

5

Poorest of the poor (POP) strategy

22

550

14,899

6

Marketing premiums for pesticide free and organic products

16

105

3,14,250

Source: Internal MIS
Journey of CMSA

Period

Phase  

Main features

2004

Piloting NPM

  • Piloting proof of concept
  • Farmers used botanical extracts
  • Technical support is provided by NGOs
  • 250 farmers
  • 400 Acres

2004-07

Incubation period

  • Focus on NPM
  • Farmers used mostly botanical extracts
  • Technical support provided by NGOs

2008-10

Exponential scaling up

  • Non-negotiables for pest management were standardized and moved towards comprehensive soil fertility management
  • Owning up by Samakhyas, gradual withdrawal of NGOs
  • Radical soil moisture conservation works
  • New interventions like the 36 by 36 models, SRI and PoP strategies targeted for the small and marginal farmers were introduced
  •  Farmer field schools stabilized
  • Strengthening of samakhyas for  management of the program ,  IT tools for monitoring and convergence for multiplier affect
  • Focus is on food security and providing regular incomes
  • Samakhyas were assisted by Professionals

2010-11

Stabilization period

  • Group certification through PGS
  • Focus is on allied activities to increase incomes particularly in rain fed areas
  • Scaling up interventions like 36 by 36 models, SRI and PoP strategies targeted for the small and marginal farmers
  • Strengthening Infrastructure for sustainable agriculture at village level
  • Scaling up of human mediated video films for effective transfer of technology
  • Pilots on integrating livestock and marketing models
  • Focusing on drudgery reduction through 6,156 NPM shops and 556custom hiring centers
  • Leveraging convergence with Nedcap, IWMP, MGNREGS, Marketing and cooperatives, Horticulture and social forestry around Rs.25 crores leveraged through convergence
  • Piloting different marketing models
Scaling up of the intervention

The results of the intervention have been so beneficial to the farmers that there has been an exponential increase in the area under sustainable agriculture. It is an expansion driven by the positive experience of the farmers. There are no predetermined targets. SERP initiated this program in 2004 with about 250 farmers and 400 acres and now it reached to more than 1 million farmers and 3 million acres. Following graph shows the exponential scaling up:

Total Investments

Investment by Project

Resources leveraged from public sector

Resources leveraged from the Commercial Sector

Outputs

Outcomes

Rs.112 Crores

Rs.112 Crores ( 22 cores from RKVY, World bank Rs.20 Crores, , Government of India Rs.32 crores under MKSP, RS.22 Crores from SGSY and Rs.11 crores from MGNREGS)

Nil

3.5 million Acres and 1.5 million farmers covered under NPM, 25,000 farmers covered under RFSA, 28,813 farmers covered under SRI, 1,06,489farmers covered under 36 by 36 models, 14,899 farmers covered under the PoP models

NPM – Cumulative additional income of Rs 1951 Crores, RFSA- Cumulative additional income of Rs 195 Crores, SRI- Cumulative additional income of Rs.14.35 Crores, 36by 36 - Cumulative additional income of Rs 295.67 Crores, PoP- Cumulative additional income of Rs24.31 Crores, Marketing Premium- Cumulative additional income of Rs 20Crores. All put together an additional income of Rs.2,489 crores.

An amount of Rs 20 crores was invested from the project and Rs 92 cores were leveraged from the public sector. The amount of Rs 112 crores was invested to reach out to nearly 1.5 million SHG households with sustainable agriculture technologies enabling these households to earn an additional income of Rs.2,489 crores.
Investments by intervention

The total population refers to total SHG members in the villages where CMSA is being implemented. CMSA covered 11 lakh farmers which accounts for 58% of the SHG members.

Intervention

Investment

Total Number of People reached

Total Target population*

Percent of target population reached

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio

Non pesticide Management and Comprehensive soil fertility management

 

15,61,342

30,91,244

50.50%

 

Rain fed sustainable Agriculture

 

25,000

145,000

17%

 

System of Rice Intensification

 

28,813

5,00000

5.76%

 

House hold level nutritional security model (36X36 models)

 

1,06,894

500,000

21.3%

 

Poorest of the poor (POP) strategy

 

14,899

100,000

14.89%

 

Marketing Premiums

 

3,14,250

10,00,000

31.42%

 

Total

Rs. 112crores ( Segregated data for each of the intervention not available )

15,61,342

 

 

Rs.717/Beneficiary

Data Source used

** Internal MIS

 

 

 

 

*the target population comprises of all SHG households in the 11000 CMSA villages. For RFSA the target consists of all SC/ST households having some land, for SRI and 36 by 36 the target households are small and marginal farmers cultivating paddy with support irrigation, for PoP the target households are mostly landless SC/ST households.
Inclusiveness Index

CMSA is biased towards SC/STs, small and marginal farmers. As per our estimation total SC/STs in CMSA villages are around 7 lakhs and CMSA covered 4.44 lakhs of SC/ST farmers which accounts for 61.4% of the total SC/ST population and about 90% of the SC/STs who have land.

Total number of PoP in target population

Total Number of PoP reached

Total Number of people reached (same as in table 1)

8,06,234 (Estimation based on sampling in few villages)

 

15,61,342

Rain fed sustainable Agriculture

 

25,000

System of Rice Intensification

 

28,813

House hold level nutritional security model (36X36 models)

 

1,06,894

Poorest of the poor (POP) strategy

 

14,899

Marketing Premiums

 

3,14,250

Total

Rs. 112crores ( Segregated data for each of the intervention not available )

15,61,342

Data Source used

** Internal MIS

 

*the target population comprises of all SHG households in the 11000 CMSA villages. For RFSA the target consists of all SC/ST households having some land, for SRI and 36 by 36 the target households are small and marginal farmers cultivating paddy with support irrigation, for PoP the target households are mostly landless SC/ST households.
Outcomes

Expected out come

Target

Achievement

% of Achievement

Area of land covered by NPM

3.5 million acres

3 million acres

90

Support systems in CMSA

CMSA provide support to women SHGs in following areas:

    A. Capacity building

    B. Decentralised Extension

    C. Building human resources

    D. Marketing

    E. Infrastructure building at village level

    F. Nurturing institutes

A. Capacity building:

Capacity building is the key component in CMSA. Financial support is only in the form of capacity building and transfer of technology. Components of capacity building includes, life cycles of pests and on enabling climatic condition for disease prevalence and spreading, farming systems, sustainable use of resources, maximizing output from a unit land area, effective utilization of inputs like Seed, organic fertilizers, sun light, water, land etc. Conservation of Renewable Natural Resources and Genetic bio diversity both flora and fauna, and SRI in Paddy received special attention. Massive capacity building programs were organized to build the capacities of various stake holders.

B. Extension support:

The transfer of technology is through community based local best practicing farmers.  Farmers field school (FFS) is the key activity for transfer of technology and sharing of best practices.   Farmers upgrade knowledge by sharing, observations and experiments. 20-25 farm families formed into a group known as “Sasyamithra Sanghas” and these sanghas are assisted by a Village activist (a practicing farmer) and a Cluster activist (for a group of five villages, he is also a practicing farmer) who facilitate the knowledge sharing processes.

C. Support for building Human Resources:

CMSA is focusing on building community best practitioners in technology transfer. They are known as “Community Resource Persons (CRPs)”.  There are 103 state level CRPs in 22 districts. These CRPs provide extension support to farmers. These practicing farmers are role models, who have adopted CMSA practices successfully in their fields and improved their net incomes. They were extensively trained in all aspects of sustainable agriculture.

D. Marketing:

The basic objective of CMSA is providing food security at household level, however support systems for provided to marketing marketable surplus of the product with reasonable premiums. Marketing outlets were established at DRDA offices, ZS offices, collectorate etc. Further awareness is created among consumers on availability of pesticide free produce with the SHG members. 2010-11, Rs. 11crores worth produce has been sold under different brands. Comprehensive strategy was developed to produce pesticide free chillies in four districts. Buyers from seven European countries visited the chilli fields and tested the produce in an internationally accredited lab for pesticide residues. They purchased Chillies at a premium price of Rs.1850/qtl.  Links were established with exporters, testing labs etc with farmers. This model is owned by community and now it is managed by community itself.

E. Infrastructure building at village level

C.M.S.A is not confined only to provision of extension services. Since it is anchored in the S.H.G network, members are able to get credit for agriculture, credit for expanding their asst base, etc. The setting up of NPM enterprises and custom hiring centres by the V.O is another service to the farmer.

F. Nurturing institutes:

CMSA is currently managed by the women S.H.Gs and their federations. That is an appropriate strategy in the incubation phase. Now that the programme has stabilised, S.E.R.P is planning to facilitate evolution of farmers groups – with both men and women. At the village level there will be a village level farmer federation, consisting of all practising SA farmers.

Challenges in implementation

A. Availability of quality technical persons:

Finding quality technical persons is one of the constraints to spread CMSA message.

B. Increasing labour costs:

CMSA methods require considerable labour for preparing extracts and growing poly crops etc. as the labour costs are increasing day by day famers want low labour requirement methods.

C. Changing lifestyles

CMSA methods require certain lifestyle changes in the farming community. Most of the farmers are unable to change their lifestyles that are influenced by marketing forces.

D. Managing workforce:

Scaling up leads to increasing workforce and managing diversified workforce is real challenge. Monitoring them and building their skills require lot of efforts and resources.

E. Reaching out to millions of farmers:

Now we could able to reach the farmers through Farmer Field School (FFS) and SHG meetings through VAs and CAs. This model is finically not viable and requires intense monitoring at all levels. We need to develop an alternative model of extension system to spread the message and increasing the adoption rates. Further we have to design innovative communication systems for effective communication with farmers.

F. Providing market linkages:

Farmers adopting sustainable agriculture methods are expecting reasonable premium prices. Providing market linkages are one of the challenges as the markets are volatile in nature, further they require certification. Certification requires considerable investments by farmers.


g. Climate change:

Most of the CMSA methods either mitigate or adapt to climate change. It is an opportunity for us to spread the message.


h. Increasing consumer awareness:

Increasing consumer awareness and changing preferences will enable the farmer to get more prices. This will motivate farmers to adopt CMSA methods.


i. Hostility of Scientific institutes and department of Agriculture:

All most all scientific institutes and department of agriculture are not accepting CMSA methods. Convincing them is very important for the future of the program. For convincing them we need to document the results in scientific way. This requires intense efforts and building the capacities of the staff in organizing experimental trails.


j. Policies favoring chemical agriculture:

Many programs supported by government are promoting chemical pesticides and chemical fertilisers. Most of the times department is providing chemical fertilisers and pesticides either on subsidies or free of cost as part of the package. This results in low turnout of the farmers towards sustainable agriculture.

Other achievements:
  • Program is showcased in Satyamevajayathe
  • Success stories of Two Poorest of the Poor women were screened in Earth summit at Riodegenero
  • m Billionth award for Mobile application
  • ILETS e-world award for Mobile application
  • Gupshop rewarded 8 lakh free SMS – Planning to using for program advisory / hand holding to Samkhyas and NPM shop owners
Cross cutting issues
Cross cutting issues covers institutional model, financing model , sustainability and resilience

Institutional Model:

The program management is in the hands of the women organizations. Separate sub committees with C.M.S.A practicing SHG women, farmers, at village, Mandal (Sub district) and district level are formed to monitor the day to day activities. All these sub committees meet once in a month to review the program. Budget is provided for sub committee’s field visits and review meetings. Sub committees will review the performance of Village activist (VA), cluster activist (CA) and District Project Manager on a monthly basis. The Samakhyas attend FFS meetings, make field inspections, pay salaries of VA/CA. Communities are involved in decision making process. The final word in programme management lies with the VOs and MMSs. The transfer of technology is through community based local best practicing farmers. Farmers field school (FFS) is the key activity for transfer of technology and sharing of best practices. Farmers upgrade knowledge by sharing, observations and experiments. 20-25 farm families formed into a group known as “Sasyamithra Sanghas” and these sanghas are assisted by a Village activist (a practicing farmer) and a Cluster activist (for a group of five villages, he is also a practicing farmer) who facilitate the knowledge sharing processes. They are paid by the S.H.G federations, the V.Os and the M.Ss to work as para extension workers, and, they are completely accountable to them. For every four to five mandals there is a technical consultant (agriculture graduate) who provides professional support to samakhyas. District level program is anchored by District Program Manager (DPM)

Use the following image as existing image from the site – colored one

Financial Model:

Core activity of CMSA is capacity building through decentralized extension system. Following are the costs involved at mandal level:

S.No

Cost item

Amount in Rs. Per year

1

Honorarium of village activist

12000

2

Honorarium of cluster activist

48000

3

Subcommittee meetings

24000

4

Subcommittee monitoring visits

96000

5

Resource Fee for Community resource Persons

30000

6

Documentation

12000

 

Total

2,22,000

CMSA is now owned and managed by community. Each farm family, including farmers outside SHG fold are paying Rs.50/- per year as registration fee. On average there will be 2000 farmers and their contribution fee will be Rs.1, 0, 0000/- and Rs.1,20, 000/- is needed from project. This year an amount of Rs.2.92 crores/- was collected as registration fee. The Village Organisations are seriously looking at how they can become financially self sustaining, through a mix of resource fees, enterprises for making formulations for pest management and dung based inoculants, village quality control laboratories, marketing of output at a premium, etc.

Sustainability:

Farmers are paying registration fee for extension services. Extension cost worked out is Rs100/Acre and each farm family is now paying Rs.50/- per year. Over period of time this amount can be increased. Further local groups formed under Participatory Guarantee System (PGS) will emerge as Producer Companies/ commodity interest group. These producer companies will bring sustainability to the program

Resilience:

CMSA is able to sustain natural calamities such as floods and droughts. Farmers adopted CMSA methods even after severe floods in 2009-10. Farmers preferred CMSA, as these methods mitigate risk. Farmers adopted CMSA methods in drought situations also.

Impacts

Increased yields:

Third party evaluation done by ANGRAU reveals that CMSA methods enabled the farmers to increase their yields. Increase in yields ranges between 1-2 qtls. Following table shows increase in yields in different crops:

S.No

Name of the district

Crop

Increase in yield in qtls

1

Kadapa

paddy

2.0

2

Chittor

Paddy

2.5

3

Vizag

paddy

2

4

Medak

Maize

1

5

Medak

Jowar

1

6

Karimnagar

Cotton

1

Source: ANGRAU, third party evaluation under RKVY

Increased savings:

Farmers adopting CMSA methods are able to save considerable amounts by avoiding chemical pesticides and reducing chemical fertilizers. Our internal studies reveal that savings are ranges between Rs.1200/Acre to Rs.16000/Acre, based on the crop. Following tables shows crop wise savings by CMSA farmers:

S.No

Name of the crop

Total savings in Rs. / Acre

1

paddy

1650

2

Chillies

16,300

3

Red gram

1550

4

Ground nut

1200

5

Cotton

5800

6

Vegetables

200


Source: Internal MIS 

Increased net additional incomes:

ANGRAU study in 300 villages in 18 districts reveals that CMSA methods increased net additional incomes to farmers. The net additional incomes range between Rs.3000 to Rs.7000 per acre based on the crop. Following table shows the net additional incomes realized by CMSA farmers:

S.No

Name of the crop

Net additional income in Rs./Acre

1

Paddy

5590

2

Maize

5676

3

Cotton

5676

4

Chillies

7701

5

Groundnut

10,483

6

Vegetables

3790

Source: ANGRAU, Third party evaluation for RKVY           

Reclamation of land from mortgage: Many farmers reclaimed their land from mortgage with savings from cost of cultivation and increased net incomes. Following table shows no farmers reclaimed land from mortgage:

S.No

Name of the district

Area given as mortgage and taken from mortgage during different years

 

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

 

 

Given as mortgaged in Acres

Taken from mortgage

Given as mortgaged in Acres

Taken from mortgage

Given as mortgaged in Acres

Taken from mortgage

Given as mortgaged in Acres

Taken from mortgage

1

Vizianagaram

12.5

0

78

0

22

54

0

58.5

2

Srikakulam

26.5

0

7

0

0

20

0

13.5

3

Karimnagar

0

0

8

0

0

0

0

8

4

Vizag

5

0

3

0

0

3

0

5

5

Nellore

12

0

8

0

0

0

0

20

6

Guntur

0

0

3.5

0

0

3.5

0

0

7

Khammam

4

0

2.5

0

0

0

0

6.5

 

Total

60

0

110

0

22

80.5

0

111.5

Source: Season end reports, SERP 
Reduced Health Risks:

Farmers report a noticeable drop in pesticide related health problems. Women who have traditionally performed the task of spraying the crops and suffered numerous health problems due to the resultant high exposure to pesticides are now strong advocates of the NPM/CMSA movement. A quick survey of three districts has shown that the number of cases of hospitalization due to pesticide poisoning has reduced from 242 cases per year before adoption of NPM to 146 cases per year—a 40 percent drop. Farmers who have adopted non-pesticide management agriculture have been totally free of pesticide related hospitalization.


No of districts

Sevier hospitalization

 

Before NPM

After NPM

 

 

Inside NPM village

Outside NPM village

3

242

Nil

146

Source: Season end reports, SERP 
Increased access to food:
Achieving self – reliance and self sufficiency in food production at community level are very important aspects of CMSA. CMSA ensures year round food security. Crop diversity and multistoried cropping systems ensures nutritional security to farm families. Perennial species such as red gram, moringa, guava and papaya take care of very critical nutritional requirements for the family throughout the year. Pesticide free produce is integrated into the existing food security scheme.
Poorest of the poor (POP) strategy enabled 5000 land less labour to access irrigated land and adopted SRI method of Paddy cultivation. This strategy increased availability of food grains at household level.  Further CMSA methods enable the farmers to reduce expenditure on food grains.

Source: Internal MIS
Marketing premiums:
Efforts are on for branding of pesticide free and organic products. Following table shows the premium prices achieved under different brands:


S.No

Name of the district

Name of the brand

Commodities

Turnover in Rs.

1

Srikakulam

Sahaja
Thrupthi

Rice
Pickles

20 lakhs
50 lakhs

2

Khammam

Kinnera

Rice, Red gram, Chilly powder

30 lakhs
20 lakhs

3

Guntur

Amaravathi

Dry Chillies, Green chillies, Chilli powder, Vegetables

6.0 Crores

4

Ranga Reddy

Prakruthi

Vegetables

3.5 crores

5

Adilabad

Susthira

Rice

50 lakhs

Total

11.2 Crores

Source: Internal MIS
Lowering of risk perception, increasing investment in agriculture:
CMSA methods build confidence on agriculture among the farmers particularly in resource poor farmers. SERP conducted a sample study in seven districts; the study reveals that large farmers prefer CMSA farmers to give their land on lease. Following table shows number of resource poor farmers taken additional land on lease:


Sl. No.

Name of The District

Number of Villages surveyed

Number of NPM families who have taken land on lease from resource rich families

 

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

1

Vizianagaram

44

20

41

63

67

2

Nellore

50

23

352

287

496

3

Vishakhapatnam

3

0

12

15

14

4

Karimnagar

20

6

12

9

12

5

Chittor

15

0

4

8

14

6

Ranga Reddy

20

15

42

10

12

7

Adilabad

50

17

95

170

276

Total

 

 

 

562

891

Source: Season end reports, SERP
Business innovation and new livelihood opportunities:
Village organizations have begun to benefit from jobs and enterprises catering to inputs for sustainable agriculture and by providing services like quality control and procurement of CMSA produce. 5876 jobs have been created in villages through the establishment of shops for supply of bio-pesticides and organic nutrients, seed banks and agricultural implements hiring centers. In addition, about 5400 small and marginal farmers are generating additional income through the operation of vermi-composting units.

System impact:                                
One of the most important aspects of CMSA is building pesticide free and organic villages.


S.No

Name of the district

No of pesticide free villages

No of Organic villages

1

Srikakulam

73

18

2

Vizag

7

3

3

Chittor

3

5

4

Vizianagaram

28

0

5

Kurnool

2

0

6

Ananthapur

3

0

7

Ranga Reddy

1

0

8

Nalgonda

1

0

9

Warangal

1

0

10

Nizamabad

1

0

11

Medak

1

0

12

Khammam

3

0

Total

124

26

Source: Internal MIS

 

Policy Impacts:  


S.No

GO.MS.No

Importance

1

Convergence with MGNREGS for development of lands belongs to Poorest of the poor (GO.Ms.No 392)

  • Radical soil and moisture conservation works through MGNRGES
  • About 25,000 acres of land belongs to POP were treated with soil and moisture conservation works
  • 25,000 acre were adopted improved cropping pattern
  • Average net incremental income for these farmers ranges between Rs.5,000 to 10,000/- acre 

2

Mainstreaming CMSA activities through Agriculture Technology Management Agency (GoMs.No.121)

  • Convergence with Agriculture Technology Management Agency (ATMA) 
  • CMSA methods will be mainstreamed
  • CMSA farmers can access funds for infrastructure development

3

Productivity enhancement and Entrepreneur promotion in Watershed (GoMs.No 110)

  • Convergence with Integrated Watershed Management Program (IWMP)
  • CMSA methods are promoted in Cultivable area under watersheds for productivity enhancement
  • Support is provided for Entrepreneur promotion

4

Mahila Kisan Saskthikaran Pariyojana (MKSP) centrally sponsored program

  • Upgrading skills of women farmers in sustainable agriculture
  • Increasing net incomes of the women farmers
 
RESOURCE MATERIAL
Adaptation and Mitigating Climate change
Botanical extracts
CMSA FAQs updated
CRP strategy in NPM
Final NPM Protocols
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